The hypocrisy of Jose Mourinho's transfer market comments

Andy Dillon by Andy Dillon / 27 July 2017, 14:56

IT’S a classic case of the blind leading the bland as Jose Mourinho expresses ‘concerns’ at the hyper ventilation in the transfer market.

The biggest spending manager in world football has suddenly spotted that there might be a little bit too much money sloshing around in the game and it’s causing problems.

Of course it’s nothing to do with him guv. A breathless transfer market which is panting more than the contestants on Love Island is everybody else’s fault.

It’s not the huge deals being sanctioned by the likes of Manchester United, Chelsea and Real Madrid, all clubs he has managed by coincidence, that are the problem.

No, it’s those overcooked, suicidal moves for B-list journeymen, the ramped, revved up over-the-odds price tags for unspectacular workaday footballers holding desperate small clubs to ransom - because they can.

Here’s what The Special One says:

“The other ones are where you have 100 transfers and for me that is the dangerous area of the market.

"Some clubs are paying or they don't buy because they don't accept the numbers that are now ruling the market, or to do it they have to go the same levels and for me that's what worries me a little bit because now we speak about £30million, £40million, £50million in such an easy way."

Tell us something we don’t know Jose.

And while we’re at it, take off those one-eyed contact lenses and take a look around. Do you really not see that by regularly throwing the annual budget of several UK state schools at an agent for the services of a footballer, you are one of the main protagonists dragging football into the world of hyper-inflation?

For example, any half-decent economist will tell you that smashing the world transfer record by handing over £89 million for Paul Pogba will mean that prices of everything else sharply upwards.

That breaking Chelsea’s club record for a player in 2004 for Didier Drogba with a £24m transfer set the bar higher for everyone else in the Premier League.

That happily coughing up £75m for Romelu Lukaku, plus £12m in agents’ fees just a few weeks ago, means people at the business end of football will be rubbing their hands together.

Mourinho has spent more than £900m in his managerial career.

Jose Mourinho

As card shark Teddy Sheringham used to say when the card games started on the back of the West Ham team bus: Here comes money.

Consequently, clubs like West Ham have just paid out a club record £26m to Stoke City for a solid but unremarkable forward in Marko Arnautovic.

Liverpool are ready to pay £60m for Virgil van Dijk, a competent centre half but one who could not make an impression on the Europa League last season and missed two open goals.

Leicester City have coughed up £17m for Harry Maguire who was part of a relegated team with Hull.

Let’s not even attempt to unravel the £200 million spent by Manchester City so far this summer.

All of it is part of the ‘trickle down’ effect of paying way too much for the best players which means the cost of the not-so-good players follows suit.

For, that Mourinho, Pep Guardiola, Antonio Conte and their respective clubs need to accept that they are the reason the transfer market is in a state of ‘madness’. Guardiola admits as much then simply shrugs his shoulders and hands over the cash.

It won’t stop until the TV money stops. And that won’t stop until the new breed of armchair fans switch over and do something more interesting instead; not just at home but abroad - which is where matches will be played before too long.

Football is drifting way out of reach of ordinary folk and Mourinho needs to acknowledge his part in that instead of shaking his head while helping the game put ever more distance between it and reality.

sackrace

Managers Departed

Last man down

Leonid Slutsky
(Hull City)
3rd December
VIEW ALL CASUALTIES

Aberdeen

Next Manager Odds

Arsenal

Next Manager Odds

Aston Villa

Next Manager Odds

Australia

Next Manager Odds

Chelsea

Next Manager Odds

Italy

Next Manager Odds

Manchester United

Next Manager Odds

Real Madrid

Next Manager Odds

Rep of Ireland

Next Manager Odds

Scotland

Next Manager Odds

Swansea City

Next Manager Odds

Wales

Next Manager Odds

Premier League

Next Manager To Leave

Football Blogging Awards Winner 2016